Tea Corner - Where you can talk to all

  • Japan is great! I loved the very different way of live there! I was in Kanazawa and in Tokyo. Tokyo was amazing! Shibuya is really nice, i met lots of interesting people.


    I was there from my last school (vocational training class) and we visited hostfamilys there, which was pretty cool - just to see how they live, how the houses are built and to see a 'typical day' there.
    By the way, the breakfast was horrible! :-D

  • Someday I will go to Japan too. But at first I'm gonna learn the language... When I'm ready with study or so...


    Can't believe that the breakfast there is horrible. Japanese food is wonderful, even when you must look what to eat because you have so many allergics.. :lamour::lamour:
    I must look for many things... For example I can't eat beans or Soy-products which are not ferementated. (for example I can eat Soy-Sauce but no Tofu or Soy-seams...)


  • Someday I will go to Japan too. But at first I'm gonna learn the language... When I'm ready with study or so...


    Can't believe that the breakfast there is horrible. Japanese food is wonderful, even when you must look what to eat because you have so many allergics..
    I must look for many things... For example I can't eat beans or Soy-products which are not ferementated. (for example I can eat Soy-Sauce but no Tofu or Soy-seams...)


    I have allergics, too. What is the reason, that I must not look what to eat?



  • Australia is still on my list. So let's see. Maybe after the Staatsexamen. ;)


    Wifi at Newark...sorry, I really don't know. :D


    I've been to Baltimore. It's not really worth a visit. The city is...let's call it, "unattractive". ;) However, the harbor is quite nice. The only place worth a visit, actually.
    But remember that even when you're 18 and in NYC, you're still not allowed to party. It's quite a little dissappointing that a city like NYC is quite a desert when it comes to underaged partying. There are some clubs but there aren't really good. You should try to go to a concert, a comedy show or visit a musical. That's the best you can do. :)


    Japan is fun. Little crazy, though but not as crazy as people might think. People are the same as here just some cultural differences not really worth mentioning. But it's horribly expensive. Try buying a watermelon for under 6 euros. Or a nice peach for 4 euros. Quite insane!
    I've been to Osaka, Kyoto, Kobe, Nara and some temple and shrine places around.


    I cannot really say anthing about Singapore but my dad was there and he told me that the airport is quite amazing. Coolest airport he's ever been to. ;)


    Annina, I have to agree with you that the "traditional" Japanese breakfast is a little...weird. :D I had to get used to fried fish, rice and cole slaw in the morning but after a couple of days it was ok.


    @Minchen, allergies are usually no problem. You only have to ask what's in the food and they (most of the time) are ready to tell. :lachen: However, you shouldn't be a vegetarian maybe. As far as I know and what my brother and the Japanese I met say, there are no vegetarians in Japan and if they are, there are so few of them they're not worth mentioning. :hmm:lachen:

  • @Annci: If I would be a vegetarian, I wouldn't be alife anymore. xD There are so much vegetable-things which I HATE to eat... no... I wouldn't be a good vegetarian. :rofl:


    Lily-Franzi: What do you mean, about: "not looking what to eat?". I'm pretty tired today... so my brain won't work so good ... :gaehn:

  • But remember that even when you're 18 and in NYC, you're still not allowed to party. It's quite a little dissappointing that a city like NYC is quite a desert when it comes to underaged partying. There are some clubs but there aren't really good. You should try to go to a concert, a comedy show or visit a musical. That's the best you can do. :)


    Yeah, I know, but that's ok.
    I'm so happy that I get to spend my 18th birthday in this city, I'm just going to enjoy the atmosphere in Manhattan and on the next day I'm gonna sit on a plane to Germany, where I can party and do whatever I want. :D
    Well, the age 21 thing is exaggerated compared to the age where you can sign up to fight abroad in the U.S. army - risking your life - which is 17 or 18....However, if you visit another country you have to either accept its laws, manners and attitudes...or don't visit it. That's what I tell people when they complain about the patriotism of the Americans. :lachen:


  • Yeah, I know, but that's ok.
    I'm so happy that I get to spend my 18th birthday in this city, I'm just going to enjoy the atmosphere in Manhattan and on the next day I'm gonna sit on a plane to Germany, where I can party and do whatever I want. :D
    Well, the age 21 thing is exaggerated compared to the age where you can sign up to fight abroad in the U.S. army - risking your life - which is 17 or 18....However, if you visit another country you have to either accept its laws, manners and attitudes...or don't visit it. That's what I tell people when they complain about the patriotism of the Americans. :lachen:


    Yeah, Manhattan is great. I hate Time Square, though. Way too many tourists for my taste and pretty boring. :lachen: I'd rather visit the Village or hang around Union Square. ;)
    Well, the 21 rule hasn't changed anything about drunk driving and people drinking underaged. My host sister was 19 and she had massive parties with booze and weed at the house. No one really cared and all the guests drove home themselves. Luckily none got ever caught by the police or had an accident. :Oo:


    Hmm...when I was in the States I accepted the laws...but I never bent to attitudes or manners if I had the feeling that they were stupid or simply wrong...and I'm still not a fan of that brainless patriotism some Americans show and the arrogance they carry with it.



    @Minchen, I love vegetarian food. So many good things. Of course, some vegetables I really don't like but I don't have to eat them, do I? ;)

  • Yeah, Manhattan is great. I hate Time Square, though. Way too many tourists for my taste and pretty boring. :lachen: I'd rather visit the Village or hang around Union Square. ;)
    Well, the 21 rule hasn't changed anything about drunk driving and people drinking underaged. My host sister was 19 and she had massive parties with booze and weed at the house. No one really cared and all the guests drove home themselves. Luckily none got ever caught by the police or had an accident. :Oo:


    Hmm...when I was in the States I accepted the laws...but I never bent to attitudes or manners if I had the feeling that they were stupid or simply wrong...and I'm still not a fan of that brainless patriotism some Americans show and the arrogance they carry with it.


    Hmm, I've never been to Union Square so maybe I'll keep that in mind form my upcoming visit to the city. I think that Times Square is an impressive place, but if I'd live there, I'd probably avoid it. :D
    Any insider advise for a second visit to NYC? Part of my familiy has never been to New York, so we'll have to do the standards as well, but this time I plan on seeing the other boroughs as well.
    I'm so much looking forward to being in New York again,


    Yeah, I've read that DUI is quite a problem over there.
    I think in Germany even teenagers and young people are "smart" enough to not do that....at least most of them, I mean it happens here, too, but after a party here you either take a taxi or the owl service of the metro or somebody in your group volunteers to not drink that night and drive everybody home.


    I actually think they'd have deserved it if they got pulled over while under drug and alcohol influence. That's absolutely unacceptable, if they want to endanger themselves, let them, but by doing it that way, they put other people in jeopardy...



    Well I didn't mean visitors should adapt to their manners and attitudes or even like them, but they have to accept them. Because that's what I'd expect from visitors in Germany.


  • Hmm...for a first time visit I would suggest a ride with the Staten Island Ferry. It's for free and lots of fun...and you'll see the boroughs...at least Staten Island. ;)
    Greenwich Village is also worth a visit and Washington Square Park...hmm...then, of course, Central Park. Oh and in the evening when the Empire State Building is already closed, you have to go to the Top of the Rock Observation Platform. It's on top of the Rockefeller Center and there are no rails and bars around but glass walls. Best view of Manhattan you can buy with money! Even better than the ESB since you actually see the ESB. ;) Loved it!
    And for the day time again: Maybe you're lucky and you run into a street fair on some of the streets. They are amazing and you can buy and eat local food as well as, depending on the area you're in, exotic food like Jamaican, Cuban, etc. Chinatown is also an option. But beware of buying anything from anyone on the street or out of cars or back doors. :lachen: The police is closer than you think. :D


    Anything else...? Not sure. Maybe I'll remember some stuff...sooner or later. ;)




    DUI is always a problem but fortunately there are also smart people and those manage to do the exact thing you described. Getting a driver. ;)


    Yeah, I got what you meant. I totally agree with you on it. Just sometimes it's hard to keep the cool and not to insult local people on their cultural ignorance on visiting cultures. Nevermind though. :lachen:

  • I am definitely gonna ride the Staten Island Ferry and visit the top of the rock, because I didn't do either of those things on my last visit.


    Have you ever been to Coney Island? I'm not really sure if I want to visit that place, because it's like a 2 hour roud-trip subway ride and I don't really know if it's worth it....


    I'm flying in this weekend and the weather is definitely not in my favor. :( Today it's 27°C and sunny in Washington, and the forecast for Monday, when I'm actually visiting the city is rain and 8°C tops....come on... :O

  • The US was great, but yeah the storm did catch us...more or less.


    We arrived at Newark early in the afternoon and only a few hours later they started cancelling flights to Newark and the airport stopped all services by the end of the day. Luckily we planned to drive down to Washington directly from Newark, which we did. At first we thought it was a bad idea, because on the track it looked like Sandy would be closer to Washington than to New York, eventually we decided to drive anyway, which turned out to be the right decision....On the Interstate all the signs would say "State of Emergency in effect"
    The next day, was the day before the night of the storm, the weather in D.C. was awful, it rained all day and they stopped all metro and bus services in the city, so we'd just drive around the city to take some pictures out of the car. By around 3 pm we went back to the hotel because everybody was advised to not leave their house on public television, that's what we did. It was pretty windy that night in D.C. and some trees came down, which we wouldn't find out until the next day. On TV we heard that many people didn't have power...we did. As the night went on the number of fatalities increased, espacially in NYC. I can't remember the total, but I think there were 80 fatilities in the US and 40 alone in New York City. 8 Million without power...., and some would be for the next two weeks....
    We planned on driving up to NY that next morning, which we postponed due to the conditions we saw on TV and spent the day in Washington, which was good, because otherwise we wouldn't really have seen much of the city.
    As we got closer to NY we saw the lines at the gas stations, which were miles long, you'd have to wait up to 6-8 hours to fuel up your car! Few days later New Jersey Law was that on even days only cars with even license plates could fuel up and vice versa...
    We arrived in NYC early in the evening in the dark and the southern part of the Manhattan skyline was completely dark......
    But the worst was over for NYC and the next day, subway services resumed in the northern part of Manhattan, trains and all MTA busses were free of charge for the next two days, which was good, and we did explore the southern part of Manhattan by bus. On the first days only HOV (High occupied vehicles) with 3 or more were allowed to cross the bridges and tunnels into Manhattan from Jersey and the other boroughs.


    Long story short: There were a few things we couldn't do because of the storm, e.g. the statue of liberty crown access tickets I booked and the 9/11 Memorial, however besides that, we weren't really affected by the storm, but we did experience some of the aftermath and damage first hand and on scene.
    Sorry for the long text, but I didn't really know how to sum that up.



    So, how have you been in the past weeks?
    Right now I'm in Brisbane, Australia and today I've been to Surfers Paradise on the Gold Coast. Australia is really beautiful! :)

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